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Please note the surgery will be closed Thursday 17th September from 12.00pm for staff Training and re-open Friday 18th September at 8am. Should you require urgent medical assistance please contact NHS 111 or A&E.

Latest News

Information about changes to medicines or treatments on

the NHS: Changes to prescribing of bath and shower

preparations

The NHS will be asking doctors to stop or greatly reduce the prescribing of some

treatments. This is because the treatments are:

Not as safe as other treatments OR

Not as good (effective) as other treatments OR

More expensive than other treatments that do the same thing.

This includes bath and shower preparations for dry and itchy skin conditions.

Which bath and shower preparations are affected?

Moisturising bath and shower preparations are bath oils that are poured into the bath

water, and bath and shower emollients which can be used to wash the body. These

products are used for dry and itchy skin conditions such as eczema.

Why will these bath and shower preparations not be prescribed

anymore?

A study showed that using pour in the bath emollients did not make any difference to

eczema symptoms and therefore using these products is not a good use of NHS

resources.

There is no good quality evidence to show that bath and shower emollients are more

effective than leave on emollients used as a soap substitute.

There are also risks with using bath emollients such as skin irritation if large amounts

are used, particularly if antiseptic bath oils are used.

What options are available instead of these bath and shower

preparations?

It is still really important to use leave-on emollient moisturisers and avoid soap.

Emollients can be used as a soap substitute. Mix a small amount (around teaspoonful)

of emollient in the palm of your hand with a little warm water and spread it over damp or

dry skin. Rinse and pat the skin dry, being careful not to rub it.

You can use soap substitutes for handwashing, showering or in the bath. Emollients do

not foam like normal soap but are just as effective at cleaning the skin.

Items which should not routinely be prescribed in primary care – bath and shower

preparations for dry and itchy skin conditions

Where can I find more information and support?

You can speak to your local pharmacist, GP or the person who prescribed the

medication to you.

Your local patient group.

NHS website https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/emollients/

The Patients Association can also offer support and advice: www.patientsassociation.

org.uk/ or call 020 8423 8999

British Medical Journal. Results of the BATHE study including patient video.

https://www.bmj.com/content/361/bmj.k1332

Find out more about the medicines that are being stopped or reduced:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/medicines/items-which-should-not-be-routinely-prescribed/

If you have any questions about the prescribing of bath and shower

prescribing please email them to: england.medicines@nhs.net

**Charity Details 2020**

Each month we will be supporting local charities.

This Month we will be supporting Bradford Central Food Bank. 

Please can you donate an item or two to help us support local families within the Bradford area. Please bring items to the collection point located in our waiting room.

food bank

Bradford Foodbank -

Providing emergency food to people in crisis.
Every day people in the UK go hungry for reasons ranging from redundancy to receiving an unexpected bill on a low income or a benefit stopping. A simple box of food makes a big difference, with foodbanks helping prevent crime, housing loss, family breakdown and mental health problems.
Please can you donate an item or two to help us support local families within the Bradford area. Please bring items to the collection point located in our waiting room.

Urgently needed food items

You can visit our Facebook page for further details and updates.

 

We have made recent changes to our appointments.

For further details please look at the 'Appointments' section on our website.

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